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QUICK TIPS GUIDE

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Screen Resizing

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Use something similar to this?

Cincinnati Museum Center

Neil Armstrong
Space Exploration Gallery

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ADVENTURE ROADMAP

Click each box to reveal the topics you will explore in this virtual field trip.

IMAGINE (click to popup info)

PROTECT (click to popup info)

EXPLORE (click to popup info)

MEET THE EXPERTS

Meet the experts from Cincinnati Museum Center and partnering learning institutions that will be guiding your virtual adventure!

Citizen of the Muscogee Nation
Greater Cincinnati Native American Coalition

April Hester

Executive Director, Greater Cincinnati Native American Coalition

Jheri Neri

Education & Outreach Manager, Red Bike Go Program

Elese Daniel

President, Hyperloop UC

Jake Gerbracht

Vice President, Hyperloop UC

Jacqueline Barney

Supervising Transportation Planner

Reggie Victor

Director, Tri-State Trails

Wade Johnston

Manager, Transportation Initiatives, Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber 

Pete Metz

Cincinnati Museum Center

Archivists and Researchers

Cincinnati Museum Center

Learning Team & Youth Program Volunteers

Cincinnati Community

Edna Lindsey, Lana Mitchell, Emily Spicer, Hannah Thomas

WCPO Television Journalist

Hasker Nelson, Jr.

Scholar and Professor

Dr. Vibert White
FOR POSITION ONLY
Play
Space Gallery Intro Video?

IMAGINE


For millennia, humans have looked up and tried to understand what they see in the sky. Some seek answers in myth ancestral knowledge and legend, while others look to scientific exploration.

Credit: Pixabay

IMAGINE SLIDE 2 - MOON TITLE


Hover cursor over map for larger view.

Lunar Phases Simlator
Click to use interactive (this will launch a new window)

Phases of the Moon
Use the SLIDE 2 text in IMAGINE document as a video script and show as video by clicking here

MOUNT- SLIDE 3


There are other observable cycles related to the sun and the moon. During the Middle Woodland period, the indigenous people of the Cincinnati region built earthworks to mark some of these longer cycles. Every year, the sun appears to move north and south. In the northern hemisphere, the northernmost sunrise and sunset occurs on the summer solstice, and the southernmost sunrise and sunset happens on the winter solstice. The Earthworks at the location we know as Fort Ancient have openings in the walls that align with the solstices.

Click the icons to learn more!

The moon also has a northernmost and southernmost moonrise on an 18.6-year cycle. The mound builders marked this cycle with a special alignments too.”

These cycles may have helped predict solar and lunar eclipses and mark important times for rituals and ceremonies.

SLIDE 4: CONSTELLATIONS


VFT DEVELPING NOTE: Images of Constelations .here. When you click one it, you can then click points on screen to start drawing from point to point. I don't know if we can do freehand drawing outlines by release but we can click form dot to dot style.

Making Connections

Many cultures have looked at the patterns made by the stars and told stories to explain what they see. The star patterns helped them remember and pass down their stories. Just like people throughout history, you can find shapes in the stars, too. These shapes are called asterisms.


“Some of these asterisms have been adopted in modern time to make up the official 88 constellations designated by the IAU. You may recognize Orion the hunter, Casseopeia the queen, and Ursa Major, the great bear as some of the official constellations adopted from the Greeks There are many patterns of stars that are not official constellations but are widely recognized. These are called asterisms. You’ve probably heard of the Big Dipper. The stars that make up the Big Dipper have been interpreted as a cooking pot, a caribou, a cart, a plough, and other shapes by many cultures throughout the northern hemisphere, where these stars are visible.


“The Southern Cross constellation is only visible further south than the United States. The Wardaman Aboriginal people of Australia called it the bag of ceremonial songs.


“Try creating your own asterisms by looking up at the stars!”

CONTENT NOTE: There is a lot of text here. Should we convert it to a video?

INTERACTIVE: Click the photo of each constellation to trace the starts

Play
SLIDE 5: [Dean Regas – talk about inspiration and eclipses]
Play
SLIDE 6: [Youth demonstration of spectroscopy]

SLIDE 7: COLOR THE UNIVERSE


Side by side comparison of the nebula photos here

“Now that we have high-powered telescopes and advanced spectrometers, we can learn more about the universe than ever before.


“The light we see is only a small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Objects in space, like stars, galaxies, pulsars, and nebulas, shine in other parts of the spectrum. By looking at the X-ray, radio, infrared, and ultraviolet portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, we can learn different information about these objects. Some objects, such as the remnants of supernovas, can be obscured behind large clouds of gas and dust. By filtering out infrared and visible portions of the spectrum, we can see what’s left of a supernova more easily.”


”NASA’s most complex telescope, the James Webb Space Telescope, takes infrared photos like these photos of the Southern Ring nebula 2,500 light years away. By using cameras that detect different wavelengths of infrared light, we can learn more about the nebula. Look closely at the two pictures and point out the differences yourself.”

Is this the slider interactive to overlap the 2 and slide it back and and forth to reveal the differene?
Using these images https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/goddard/2022/nasa-s-webb-captures-dying-star-s-final-performance-in-fine-detail

INTERACTIVE: Click the photo to interact with it.

SLIDE 8: CRATER MAKER


“We can also learn about space by looking at what falls to Earth. Each year, thousands of tons of space rock and dust enters Earth’s atmosphere. Most of it burns up completely in the atmosphere. Some of it makes it to the surface as dust or very small rocks. But every once in a while, a large meteorite impacts the surface with enough force to form a crater. Celestial bodies without a thick atmosphere, such as the moon and Mercury, are hit much more often and are covered in craters.”


“Scientists search for meteorites on Earth in Antarctica, where they are easier to find preserved in the snow. Meteorites can be as old as 4.6 billion years. Studies of these meteorites tell us about the makeup of the early solar system.”

Click on the image below to launch Crater Maker - Interactive

Please close the new browser tab to return to this presentation.

Play
can all this text from word doc be in the video?
SLIDE 9: [Youth demonstration of pie pan craters] - Possibly use Wonder Zone video

PROTECT - SLIDE 1


Pretend you’re on completely flat land. If you were to take a telescope and aim it at the horizon, you would only be able to see 3 miles away from you. Similarly, if you hopped in a hot-air balloon and rose as high as it could take you, you’d be a few hundred feet above the tallest building in the world, and your horizon would be 60 miles away. In a plane at cruising altitude, you can see a little more than 230 miles around you. What if you went higher? How far would you be able to see?

Credit: Pixabay

Field of Vision demonstration

We have looked up at the sky for centuries. By launching rockets, satellites and crewed spacecraft into space, we can get a much more complete look at the earth.

SLIDE 2: TIMELINE (need to layout better)

High above in the exosphere, satellites were first used by scientists to collect data and take photographs. As technology advanced, our photos became more precise


“Although scientists still utilize regular photography, they can study the earth in new and important ways by using spectroscopy, radar, LIDAR, ultraviolet and infrared cameras and other technology aboard satellites and spacecraft. Let’s take a look at how scientists use different technologies on satellites to learn about Earth.”

IMGINE SLIDE 3: TROPICAL STORM (need to layout better)

This photo of tropical storm Aletta was taken in June of 2018 by NASA’s Terra satellite. Images like this aren’t anything fancy. If you were looking from space at Aletta, you’d likely see this exact image.


This photo it is also a photo of Aletta. Looks different, doesn’t it? This photo was taken with different equipment on a different satellite, called the GPM Core Observatory satellite. So how was this photo taken?

Perhaps a Question Mark style icon or this info i icon, in a gray box and when clicked it essentially goes to the next slide to reveal the answer.

SLIDE 4: MICROWAVE IMAGER

(do we add some "Answer" logo to identify it as the answer to the last slide?)

First, the GPM used its Microwave Imager. The imager operates like the camera on your smartphone, but where your camera ‘sees’ visible light, the GMI ‘sees’ microwave radiation.


Using its Microwave Imager, the satellite collects data about microwaves coming from Earth, which helps it model how much rain is coming down at different places in the storm. It then uses that data to create storm maps such as this 2D image of Aletta.

SLIDE : RADAR

The second important instrument on the GPM satellite is its radar. Much like the radar on an aircraft, the radar on the satellite sends out energy signals. When those signals meet interference, like droplets of rain in a hurricane, the signal is modified by the interference, and it bounces back to the satellite.


The second important instrument on the GPM satellite is its radar. Much like the radar on an aircraft, the radar on the satellite sends out energy signals. When those signals meet interference, like droplets of rain in a hurricane, the signal is modified by the interference, and it bounces back to the satellite.

The interference tells the radar both the size of the rain particle and how much rain is falling. The radar aboard the GPM can even collect data in 3D! This gives scientists a look inside the storm, which helps them predict how the storm will develop.”

SLIDE 6: SENSING MICROWAVES

Sensing microwaves and using radar are just some of the neat ways satellites learn more about our planet. But what other ways can scientists use satellite data? Radar can also be used to record sea-surface height, which not only allows us to see how the ocean is changing over time but also helps us get an idea of what the bottom of the ocean looks like.


Play
SLIDE 7: [Monitoring Infrared radiation
(there was woding in the text that made me think this might be a video]

SLIDE 8: GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

We are living in a world changed by human activity, and you can see the effects of this activity from satellites, too. In our reality of changing climate, looking down on our planet can help us research and ultimately protect our home.

If we need more contenton this page (or for consistency) we can have this launch to a new tab with a button like we do with some other external resources.


SLIDE 9a: DEFORESTATION

Deforestation is difficult to detect with the naked eye, so scientists are training computers to do the heavy lifting. By analyzing satellite photos, computers can detect deforestation and predict where deforestation will likely happen.

If we need more contenton this page (or for consistency) we can have this launch to a new tab with a button like we do with some other external resources.


SLIDE 10: GLACIERS


At the North and South Poles, scientists use satellites to understand how melting glaciers affect the rise of sea levels. The Lambert Glacier in Antarctica, the largest glacier in the world, is 400 km long, which is about the distance between Cincinnati and Chicago.

Fly-over video of glacier

Because the glacier is so massive, scientists can detect changes in its gravitational field when it melts. Where do you think the water goes when a glacier melts? By studying the gravitational field of glaciers from satellite data, we’re able to determine where the melted ice ends up.

Ice flow video

Add full screen photo of that spans as backgorund behind text and shows fully on this right half of...
+ map pointing to where the Lambert glacier is, and maybe overlaying the glacier on a map showing Chicago and Cincinnati for scale?

SLIDE 11: POLAR BEARS


But what about the polar bears living on the melting ice caps? How have they been reacting to their shrinking habitat? Where do they go when the ice melts? Ecologists and zoologists use GPS to track wildlife, especially those threatened by climate change, like the polar bear. Take a look at how far a polar bear can travel using the International Polar Bear Tracker.

Click on the image below to launch
Polar Bear Tracker

Please close the new browser tab to return to this presentation.

SLIDE 12: MITIGATE CLIMATE CHANGE


Scientists are working to mitigate climate change – and you can help, too. There are lots of different ways to join the effort.”

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SLIDE 13: CHOICES


Reflect on your choices: how do your choices impact the planet, and in what ways can you lessen that impact? For example, how do you get from place to place? What kinds of foods are you eating, and how did that food get to your plate? How do you keep yourself warm in winter and cool in summer? Where does your power come from?

+ list this on screen

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SLIDE 14: WORK TOGETHER


We are often most powerful when we work together. Encouraging your friends and family to act in climate-conscious ways is another step toward protecting our planet. You can also join community organizations, talk with local decision-makers or start your own organization to influence community choices.

+ list this on screen

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SLIDE 15: CLIMATE SIMULATOR


By participating in democracy, you can also support candidates that advocate for the changes you’d like to see in the world. Those candidates can influence climate policy and funding.

Policy can also influence the decisions corporations make. Since 1988, 100 companies have been responsible for 71% of the planet’s carbon emissions. Some companies have acted to reduce their carbon footprint, but their actions don’t come close to the sweeping reforms we need to live more sustainably on Earth.


Climate change is a huge problem, one that needs an equally huge response. Through policy, we can protect the future of our planet. Use the climate policy simulator to see the different ways policy can impact climate change.”

Click on the image below to launch
Climate Simulator

Please close the new browser tab to return to this presentation.

Needs developing

SLIDE 16: PROTECT SUMMARY


Together, we’ve ascended above the clouds to learn about satellites, how scientists use them to learn about climate change and what you can do to make a difference. High above Earth, there’s so much to learn and see, and many more discoveries to be made. Let’s take a moment to learn a bit more about where we’ve been and what lies ahead.

Add full screen photo of that spans as backgorund behind text and shows fully on this right half of...???

EXPLORE- SLIDE 1


On July 20, 1969, after years of intensive research, calculations, and physical training, humankind took its first steps on the moon. Neil Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin and Michael Collins were Earth’s first ambassadors to the moon during the Apollo 11 mission.

Moon walk and Lander

Crater

EXPERIMENTS - SLIDE 1a

While the focus of the Apollo 11 mission was traveling to and from the moon safely, NASA also wanted to learn more about the moon’s environment. During the 21 hours that they were on the moon, Armstrong and Aldrin took pictures, collected soil and rock samples and set up experiments while Michael Collins orbited the moon overhead.

Moon Experiment

Experiment

NEIL ARMSTRONG- SLIDE 2

In Cincinnati, Neil Armstrong was a community leader. He worked with local organizations like the YMCA, the Ohio Commission on Public Service and Cincinnati Museum Center, serving as a member of the board of trustees for nine years.

While the focus of the Apollo 11 mission was traveling to and from the moon safely, NASA also wanted to learn more about the moon’s environment. During the 21 hours that they were on the moon, Armstrong and Aldrin took pictures, collected soil and rock samples and set up experiments while Michael Collins orbited the moon overhead.

BOK THE ROCK- SLIDE 2a

Armstrong presented an Apollo 11 moon rock to CMC on April 18, 2008. This rock, which he nicknamed “Bok,” is a very special part of the gallery. Listen to Neil Armstrong name Bok and tell us his story.

Bok the Rock.
This wil open a new tab. Please close it to return to this presentation.

BOK the ROCK photo

We do not need to use the Inhand Bok the Rock screen.
I can bring over the audio.
Not final audio icon. The yellow will become white

SLIDE 3: FLIGHT JACKET


Patch interactive

This flight jacket was worn by Neil Armstrong during the Apollo 11 mission. The patches on the jacket give important information about the astronaut and the mission.

Click on a patch to see a blow up with extra information

Click the icons to learn more about each patch

Extravehicular Activity Suite- SLIDE 4

This replica of Armstrong’s spacesuit is called the Extravehicular Activity suit, also known as the EVA suit. Suits like this were essential to the Apollo 11 mission since they protect against the lack of oxygen and extreme temperatures in space.


Underneath the golden helmet, Neil Armstrong wore a communications carrier, which is a snug cap fitted with microphones and speakers used for communication during a spacewalk.


Astronauts nicknamed this cap the Snoopy cap due to its resemblance to the hat worn by the cartoon character. Do you see the resemblance too? When Neil Armstrong said, “That’s one small step for man; one giant leap for mankind,” it was into the microphones attached to this Snoopy cap.

PERFECT JOB - Slide 5

Buzz Aldrin, Michael Collins, and Neil Armstrong were just one piece in the enormous puzzle of sending people to the moon. The pivotal landing was made possible with the efforts of more than 400,000 people. Click around the gallery to view the stories of different individuals who made the Apollo 11 mission a success.

Norm Cassen

Katherine Johnson