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Cincinnati Museum Center

Public Landing


Explore the cobblestone streets of a bustling Riverwalk in a city built on pork, beer, innovation and determination. Wander through historic shops including a dressmaker, printer, open-air market, photography studio and more. Step aboard the Queen of the West steamboat and learn why river travel was the heart and soul of Cincinnati’s early economy.

THE OHIO RIVER

MRS. RUGGLES’ DRESS SHOP

BALL AND THOMAS PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO

MERRELL'S APOTHECARY

ADVENTURE ROADMAP

Click each box to reveal further information on topics relating to the Public Landing virtual field trip. The boxes are numbered according to the order in which each subject appears in the experience.

HENRY BOYD

GIBSON PRINTERS

BEERHALL & FIFTH ST. MARKET

POLITICAL STAGE

MEET THE EXPERTS

Meet the experts from Cincinnati Museum Center and partnering learning institutions that will be guiding your virtual adventure!

Professor of History and Global and Intercultural Studies, Miami University

Kimberly A. Hamlin, PhD

Executive Director, Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives and Edward M. Ackerman Family Distinguished Professor of the American Jewish Experience and Reform Jewish History, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion

Gary P. Zola, PhD

Associate Professor of Social Studies Education & History, Faculty Senate Parliamentarian, Black Studies and History Department Affiliate,
Northern Kentucky University

David Childs, PhD

Senior Director of Museum Experience, Cincinnati Museum Center

Vanessa Van Zant-Macy

Cincinnati Museum Center Archivists and Librarians

Jill Beitz and Christine Engels

Cincinnati Museum Center

Learning Specialists

Section 1

THE OHIO RIVER


The Ohio River helped Cincinnati flourish as a major economic and cultural hub in the 1850s. It allowed trade goods to flow in and out of the city and it moved immigrants and migrants into their new home. Although the river shaped the city, the threat of flooding presented challenges for downtown residents and business owners.

Image: Rombach & Groene. "Chris Greene" Steamer, Greene Line Steamers, Inc. (SC#296-4032). Cincinnati Museum Center History Library and Archives.

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Learn more about flooding in Cincinnati.

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Check out this 1856 map view of Cincinnati!

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Click on the image below to launch Wharfmaster's Log Interactive

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Section 1.1

NEWCOMERS


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What was life like for free African American Cincinnatians in the mid-19th century? Explore this question with Dr. David Childs.

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Learn about the dangers that Cincinnati’s African American residents faced in the 1850s.

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Section 2

MRS. RUGGLES’ DRESS SHOP


Image: Courtesy of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection.

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Click on the image below to launch Getting Dressed Interactive

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Section 3

BALL AND THOMAS PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO


JP Ball photographed Cincinnatians, famous Americans, Civil War soldiers, and more until he left the city of Cincinnati in 1871. Ball's studio became one of the most well-known galleries in the United States.

Image: “Ball’s Great Daguerrian Gallery of the West” featured in Gleason's Pictorial Drawing-Room Companion

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Click on the image below to launch "How was it made? The Daguerreotype"
Presented by the Victoria and Albert Museum

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Click on the image below to launch Cartes de visite Interactive

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Section 4

MERRELL’S APOTHECARY


In the early 1800s, medicine was loosely regulated, and most doctors had little training and limited medical knowledge. By the mid-1800s, many doctors were questioning older medical practices. A growing number of doctors, William Merrell included, attended medical school and developed science-based cures.

Image courtesy of Eva Elijas via Pexels.

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Learn about the effective and not-so-effective remedies in medicine during the mid-1800s by clicking each numbered icon.

Section 5

HENRY BOYD


Henry Boyd was born into slavery in Kentucky in 1802. At an early age, he developed an interest in carpentry. Boyd’s enslaver allowed him to work and earn money to buy his own freedom, which he did when he was 18 years old. He worked for a salt works company in West Virginia for a few years before saving enough money to move out of the South. In 1826, Boyd used most of his savings to move to Cincinnati.

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Meet Henry Boyd and learn more about his time here in Cincinnati.

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Learn more about Boyd’s iconic bedstead.

Section 6

GIBSON PRINTERS


Image: Courtesy of Internet Archives

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Click on the image below to launch Type Foundry Interactive

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Section 7

SCHEUMAN’S BEER HALL


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Section 7.1

FIFTH ST. MARKET


As Ohio cities grew, so did small-scale market gardening. These garden plots allowed families to grow and sell crops to local markets. By 1859, more than half of Ohio’s market garden crops came from Hamilton County. Fifth Street Market, located on the Public Landing, gave Cincinnati residents access to fresh food.

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Immerse yourself in the sounds of a bustling market.

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Section 8

POLITICAL STAGE


Image: Dividing the national map, 1860. Courtesy of the Library of Congress

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Join Dr. Hamlin as she discusses the key takeaways of womens' lives during the mid-1800s.

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Join Dr. Childs as he discusses the key takeaways of life for African Americans during the 1850s.

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Click on the image below to launch Political Stage Interactive

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THANK YOU FOR VISITING

Thank you for exploring the Public Landing at Cincinnati Museum Center. To discover more, check out our other Virtual Field Trips and a wide array of online resources, including our WonderZone videos and the Learning from Home section of our website. Visit www.cincymuseum.org/learning-from-home. To learn more about the Cincinnati History Library and Archives, visit www.cincymuseum.org/cincinnati-history-library-archives.

To explore CMC’s epic exhibits in-person, click the button below to purchase tickets! *Due to COVID-19, some exhibits may be closed. Please check www.cincymuseum.org prior to visiting for the most up-to-date list of open experiences.

To reserve other Virtual Field Trip experiences, click the button below to explore CMC’s current offerings! Remember to always check back, as we frequently add new experiences.

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